Stephen Deutch, Photographer

Trade Paper – $23.50

ISBN 978-0-929968-06-3
Publication Date
June 1994
Page Count
144 pages
Trim Size
9 x 9
ISBN
0-929968-06-9

Stephen Deutch, Photographer

From Paris to Chicago 1932-1989
Stephen Deutch
Stephen Deutch occupies an unusual place in the history of photography. Deutch is one of the few photographers who succeeded in the highly competitive world of commercial photography while at the same time earning widespread recognition and gaining personal satisfaction in his editorial and artistic photographic work. In Chicago, where Steve Deutch has worked for more than fifty years, he has captured life, full-face: in all its power and glory and pain. Like his dear friend, Nelson Algren, he saw the tragicomic face of a clown city; in his portraits of Mahalia Jackson, he saw its radiance. Yet it is in the many portraits of anonymous residents that he has seen all of the city's attributes.
Includes 158 color and b/w photographs.
About the Author

Stephen Deutch occupies an unusual place in the history of photography. Deutch is one of the few photographers who succeeded in the highly competitive world of commercial photography while at the same time earning widespread recognition and gaining personal satisfaction in his editorial and artistic photographic work. In Chicago, where Steve Deutch has worked for more than fifty years, he has captured life, full-face: in all its power and glory and pain.
Reviews

"The arresting eye of a poet, the invigorating warmth of a man of conscience—these constitute the signature of Stephen Deutch's art. It is no wonder that Nelson Algren, who shared these qualities in his writing, considered Deutch his closest friend and was a great admirer of his photographs." —Jan Herman, Los Angeles Times 

"[The] title [of this book] should read: Stephen Deutch, Photographer, Artist, Gentleman: From Paris to Chicago, 1932-1989 An Original!" —Victor Skrebneski, photographer

"Deutch's early work on the tough streets of Europe in his early days, and of Chicago most of his long, still-productive life, brings to mind Whitman: 'I do not doubt but the majesty and beauty of the world are latent in any iota of the world....I do not doubt there is far more in trivialities, insects, vulgar persons, slaves, dwarfs, weeds, rejected refuse, than I have supposed.' Deutch spent his professional life in the battle to join the documentary photograph to the art community's and his own sense of design.... His oeuvre stands as an adornment to the tradition of Stieglitz, Walker Evans and Brassai, someplace between the masterly pose and the artful documentary." —Art Shay, photographer