Man from Nebraska

Trade Paper – $16.00

ISBN 978-0-8101-2347-2
Publication Date
January 2007
Page Count
112 pages
Trim Size
6 x 9
ISBN
0-8101-2347-9

Man from Nebraska

A Play
Tracy Letts

A luxury sedan, a church pew, a cafeteria table, a favorite TV show, and visits to a nursing home form the comfortable cycles of the dull daily life of middle-aged insurance salesman Ken Carpenter. Then one night, he awakens to find that he no longer believes in God. To the surprise of his very understanding (to a point) wife and his two grown daughters who think he has lost his mind, Ken decides to find himself and his faith by flying to London, where he was stationed while in the Air Force. He navigates through the new and somewhat dangerous realm of British counter-culture and ultimately finds his way back home. Tracy Letts's moving, funny, and spiritually complex play dares to ask the big questions, and by doing so, reveals the hidden yearning and emotion that spur the eccentric behavior of seemingly ordinary people.
About the Author

An ensemble member at the Steppenwolf Theater, Tracy Letts is an actor, director, and playwright, who has appeared in several motion pictures and television shows in addition to his stage credits. His first play Killer Joe was a blockbuster hit on London's West End in 1993 and won the Fringe First Award from the Edinburgh Theater Festival. The Barrow Street Theater production of Bug was the winner of the 2004 Lortel Award for Outstanding Play. Also, Letts's screenplay of Bug will soon be filmed, starring Ashley Judd and Michael Shannon, and directed by William Friedkin. His most recent play Man From Nebraska was named one of Time magazine's ten best theater events of 2003 and was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize in Drama. Letts is the recipient of the 2005 21st Century Award from the Chicago Public Library Foundation. He divides his time between New York City and Chicago.
Reviews
"[A]n austere and moving portrait." --Time
"In this beautifully observed tale of seemingly ordinary souls at bay, Letts has seized on a familiar theme only to craft a tremendously mature and multifaceted portrait of the American psyche at large in the world at the dawn of the 21st century." --Hedy Weiss, Chicago Sun-Times