The Humanities in the Age of Information and Post-Truth

The Humanities in the Age of Information and Post-Truth

Edited by Ignacio López-Calvo and Christina Lux

The essays in The Humanities in the Age of Information and Post-Truth represent a defense of the social function of the humanities in today's society. Edited by Ignacio López-Calvo and Christina Lux, the volume explains different ways in which the humanities and the arts, beyond their intrinsic and nonfunctional value, may be a valuable tool in our search for social justice, human empathy, freedom, and peace, all the while helping us answer many of the twenty-first century's big questions. Some essays explore the ways in which the humanities may help us imagine a different, more just world, and articulate politically effective mechanisms to achieve such goals. Others address the place of the humanities and the arts amid the ontological and epistemological uncertainties constantly produced in a fast-changing world. 

While the reader may suspect that these types of lucubration are a desperate reaction to decreased public funding for the humanities worldwide, a decreased enrollment of students, or anxiety over the future of our profession, there is in this volume a coherent argument for the continued need, perhaps more now than ever, to invest in humanities education if we are to have informed and socially conscious citizens rather than just willing consumers and obedient workers. Furthermore, the essays prove that the humanities and the arts are, after all, not a luxury but an integral part of a complete scholarly education.
 
About the Author

IGNACIO LÓPEZ-CALVO is a professor of Latin American literature at the University of California Merced. His most recent book is Dragons in the Land of the Condor: Writing Tusan in Peru (2014). 

CHRISTINA LUX is the associate director of the Center for the Humanities at the University of California Merced.
 
Reviews

“This collection of thought-provoking essays, an example of impeccable scholarship by eminent critics of our time, addresses a timely topic: the role/future of humanities in the increasingly corporatized Academe that relies heavily on what has been termed by critics as 'technical legality'. It effectively makes the case for a Humanities that foster and encourage creativity to enable and aid our successful functioning in the robotized world of the near future by underlining its complexities.—Silvia Nagy-Zekmi, co-editor of Global Academe: Engaging Intellectual Discourse