A Companion to Ancient Philosophy

A Companion to Ancient Philosophy

Edited and with an introduction by Sean D. Kirkland and Eric Sanday

A Companion to Ancient Philosophy is a collection of essays on a broad range of themes and figures spanning the entire period extending from the Pre-Socratics to Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic thinkers. 

Rather than offering synoptic and summary treatments of preestablished positions and themes, these essays engage with the ancient texts directly, focusing attention on concepts that emerge as urgent in the readings themselves and then clarifying those concepts interpretively. Indeed, this is a companion volume that takes a very serious and considered approach to its designated task—accompanying readers as they move through the most crucial passages of the infinitely rich and compelling texts of the ancients. Each essay provides a tutorial in close reading and careful interpretation. 

Because it offers foundational treatments of the most important works of ancient philosophy and because it, precisely by doing so, arrives at numerous original interpretive insights and suggests new directions for research in ancient philosophy, this volume should be of great value both to students just starting off reading the ancients and to established scholars still fascinated by philosophy's deepest abiding questions.
 
About the Author

SEAN D. KIRKLAND is an associate professor of philosophy at DePaul University and the author of The Ontology of Socratic Questioning in Plato's Early Dialogues

ERIC SANDAY is an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Kentucky and the author of A Study of Dialectic in Plato's "Parmenides." 
 
Reviews

"A Companion to Ancient Philosophy introduces ancient texts with a hermeneutic that is both historically grounded and contemporary. It contains twenty concise yet deep essays on issues fundamental to Greek thought by some leading scholars in continental philosophy. It is a fresh, insightful introduction to the essential questions of ancient Greek philosophy and why they are still alive for us today." —Marina McCoy, author of Wounded Heroes: Vulnerability as a Virtue in Ancient Greek Literature and Philosophy

“A companion in the best sense of the word, Kirkland and Sanday’s volume invites us to tarry with and encounter anew the philosophers of antiquity. Careful, rigorous, even provocative, the essays collected here show us what it means to think with the ancients.” –Emanuela Bianchi, author of The Feminine Symptom: Aleatory Matter in the Aristotelian Cosmos