The Almanac

Trade Paper – $18.95

ISBN 978-0-8101-2835-4
Publication Date
October 2012
Categories
Page Count
92 pages
Trim Size
6.125 x 8.5
ISBN
0-8101-2835-7

The Almanac

Poems
Steve Straight

While the poems in Steve Straight’'s new collection lead the reader "into the dark forest of memory / or onto the carnival ride of hypothesis, / or even right off the cliff of surprise," they maintain a sure course through the din and distraction of modern life. Bits of news from the natural sciences, chance encounters, and even the convicted felon and crafting queen Martha Stewart all fall under Straight’s observant eye. The result is a collection of conversational poems that lend a sense of wonder to the commonplace. Billy Collins, former poet laureate of the United States, says, "Every one of the poems in The Almanac achieves that rare thing in the streets of contemporary poetry: they are just plain interesting."
About the Author

Steve Straight is a professor of English and director of the poetry program at Manchester Community College in Connecticut. He is the author of a previous collection of poetry, The Water Carrier (Curbstone, 2002), which was featured on the nationally syndicated radio program "The Writer’s Almanac with Garrison Keillor."

Reviews

“Steve Straight is a poet of everyday experience whose disarmingly casual voice can lead the reader into deeper waters of insight and modest epiphanies.  Every one of the poems in The Almanac achieves that rare thing in the streets of contemporary poetry: they are just plain interesting.”

 

                                                            Billy Collins

“‘…even the universe lives to breathe / and with that breath it wants to sing,’ writes Steve Straight in this new collection of poems that sing the universe so beautifully. These tender (and often very funny) meditations on the nature of nature, the fierceness and delicacy of love, and the consolations of language delighted me with their freshness and wisdom. To see the world through Steve Straight’s eyes is to see it anew. And isn’t this what we ask of the best poetry?”

 

George Bilgere, author of The White Museum